Category: Uncategorized

Variation in Spanish Slang

You would be surprised at the variation in Spanish slang among Spanish-speaking countries. The word, “guagua,” for example, means “baby” in Chile and “bus” in Cuba! A traffic jam is called “una cola” in Peruaner slang; in Chile it is called “un taco;” in Panama it is called “tranque;” and in Puerto Rico it is called “un tap’n.”

Check out while you are learning Spanish Slang how to make the sociopath test:

Here are some more Spanish Slang phrases:

a (la) merced de
idiom. at the mercy of. (n.b.: the “la” is often omitted)
a altas horas de la madrugada
idiom. in the small hours of the morning
a cargo de
idiom. in charge of; responsible for; by
a causa de
idiom. because of; as a result of. (lit.: at the cause of)
a chorros
idiom. in abundance; plenty; lots
a contrapelo
idiom. wrong way; backwards; backassed
a corto plazo
idiom. in the short run; short-term; in the short term. (lit.: at short place)

Spanish Slang never ends!

zorro
n.m. sharp person. (lit.: fox)

zurrar la badana a alg. idiom. beat someone up; give someone a good tanning; tan someone’s hide. (lit.: thrash the tanned sheepskin of someone)

zutano
n.m./f. so-and-so; somebody or other

Spanish Slang at its best…

animal
n.m. brute; animal. (lit.: animal; n.b.: applies to both sexes and is insulating)

año nuevo, vida nueva
idiom. Happy New Year. (lit.: new year, new life; used as a greeting or statement around Jan. 1)

antigualla
n.f. piece of junk; old, ratty thing. (n.b.: derogatory)

Today’s favourite… do you already know these?

a la altura
idiom. at the level; up to. (lit.: at the height)

a la intemperie
idiom. in the open. (lit.: at/on the elements. Intemperie refers to the weather and other forces in the physical, natural world, particularly as experienced without the benefits of technology, particularly modern technology)

a la par de
idiom. on the same level as

Three more for Spanish Slang

a (la) merced de
idiom. at the mercy of. (n.b.: the “la” is often omitted)

a altas horas de la madrugada
idiom. in the small hours of the morning

a cargo de
idiom. in charge of; responsible for; by

Why learn Spanish Slang?

Hello! It’s been a while since I wrote my last post. But here we are today and I would like to get right into the main reason why I strongly believe that it is important to learn Spanish Slang. There may be reasons for different people to to learn the slang at various stages in life… but here are my top 3 Reasons:

  1. The “locals” really appreciate you. This is important! Because afterall you learn the language because you want to connect to PEOPLE and their culture. How will you do it if they don’t appreciate your Spanish?
  2. You will understand people better. Hey, did you learn Spanish to find out that actually you are not really understanding a word of what REAL people are saying? :)
  3. The culture is yours. While you might get to know a culture through food and wine, you also do through SLANG.

These are my top reasons… what are yours? Let me know, ping me on Facebook or Twitter, post a comment, share with a friend… if you want to learn Spanish Slang, then you are at the right spot! Saludos, Pedro

Lazy in Spanish Slang

How to say “lazy” in Spanish Slang!

In all Spanish speaking countries there is at least one colloquial way of saying lazy… because let’s be honest: everybody likes to be lazy at one point or another. It is one of those nice things in live to be able to laze around some day. :)

In Ecuador you would say:

Caimán—Lazy person
or
Calzonazo—Lazy man

or you could also use: Pipón—Lazy person

In Spain you can say you are “floja / flojo” – lazy

or  “un huevón / una huevona” – lazy person / layabout (derogatory)

In Puerto rico you might say “Bambalan” – Lazy Bum

On the other hand, in Argentina they have q very nice, but rude, expression: “rascarse [ps-ref v] [rude] lit. to scratch oneself; to do nothing useful, to be lazy, to lie around wasting time.”

I hope this helps for the start about how to say lazy in Spanish slang! Cheers, Chris

Peruvian Slang

Peruvian Slang – the slang from Peru!

This is a list of Spanish slang from Peru that will definitely come in handy as you travel through the wonderful country of Peru. Many of the peruvian slang words and phrases from Peru also come from the native ‘Indian’ languages that are spoken in the region. Not al of them can truly be classified as Spanish. :-) Have fun!

1)  Peruvian Slang: a la tela

     English: elegant dress or formal wear

2) Peruvian Slang: achorado

    English: an individual with a defiant character.

3)  Peruvian Slang: al polo

     English: very cold (in particular to drinks)

4) Peruvian Slang: altiplano

    English: The high flatlands which surround Lake Titicaca.

5)  Peruvian Slang: b

     English: hungry

6) Peruvian Slang: arranchar

    English: to enrapture

7)  Peruvian Slang: arruga

     English: debt

8) Spanish Slang: auqui

    English:  The heir to the Inca throne.

9)  Spanish Slang: bamba

     English: a fake or imitation

10) Spanish Slang: blanquita

    English: cocaine

11)  Spanish Slang: botánica

     English: bottle

12) Spanish Slang: cabro/cabrilla

    English: a male with feminine characteristics

13) Spanish Slang: cachar

    English: to have sexual relations.

14) Spanish Slang: cachuelo

    English: a temporary job.

15) Spanish Slang: cajón

    English: A box made of wood which uses a sound hole and is used in music of Afro-Peruvian origins.

16) Spanish Slang: calabacita

    English: cabeza vacía, persona vacua

17) Spanish Slang: campesino

    English: Peasant

18) Spanish Slang: cáncer

    English: cigarette or tobacco product

19) Spanish Slang: caña

    English: automobile

20) Spanish Slang: cañacero

    English: A drunk who consumes inexpensive liquor.

21) Spanish Slang: carabina

    English: face

22) Spanish Slang: causa

    English: the term for friend which is used between men

23) Spanish Slang: cholo

    English: Referring to a person who is mestizo.

24) Spanish Slang: coca cola

    English: crazy

25) Spanish Slang: cocho/a

    English: father/mother

26) Spanish Slang: cofla

    English: thin/skinny

27) Spanish Slang: coima

    English: comisión que se da para obtener algo en forma illegal – bribe.

28) Spanish Slang: coimero.

    English: a person who receives a bribe

29) Spanish Slang: corredgidor

    English: This was the crown envoy during colonial times who was the administrator of Indian labor.

30) Spanish Slang: cojudo

    English:  a strong insult

31) Spanish Slang: como cancha.

    English: a lot

32) Spanish Slang: corvina

    English: tie

33) Spanish Slang: costilla

    English: girlfriend

34) Spanish Slang: criollada

    English: deceit, fraud, trick

35) Spanish Slang: chaira.

    English: knife, dagger

36) Spanish Slang: chancay.

    English: to have sex

37) Spanish Slang: chancar

    English: study

38) Spanish Slang: chancón.

    English: a studious person

39) Spanish Slang: chancha

    English: charity, cooperation

40) Spanish Slang: chancho

    English: belch , rear end, butt.

 


 

About Spanish Slang:

There are more than 350 million people on this planet that speak Spanish as their first language. Every day, every where, the language of the streets evolves and new Spanish slang is born. This websites is a great Spanish slang collection that aims to gather all the slang from all the countries in the Spanish speaking world.

The language can be very different from one place to the other. As an example, in Spain you will often here the ‘slang’ word “tio” to mean ‘dude’. However, in Mexico you would seldom hear tio in this context. You would rather hear ‘guei’.
You see, learning Spanish comes in many different stages, and right from the start it is important to learn the formal language as well as the slang, or the language ‘as spoken by the people’.

You need to be aware of the fact, that Spanish slang is often so commonly used that you can hardly call it slang anymore. This doesn’t mean however, that you can ignore the rules of formal language when speaking Spanish. Please thrive to be kind and educated at all times.

This site is an attempt to collect all the Spanish slang in the world and make it easy to trace, look-up and learn it via this website.

Feel free to contribute to the collection as it should be ever expanding.

Happy Spanish learning!

Saludos, the Spanish-Slang Team

Useful Links:

http://www.languagerealm.com/spanish/spanishslang.php

http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/spanish/cool/

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Spanish/Slang

http://www.expatperu.com/peruvian-slang-or-jerga.html

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=spanish%20slang

http://wikilatino.com/index.php/Spanish_Slang_Words_%26_Phrases

Spain Slang

Spain Slang – the Slang from Spain!

Spain is the country where Spanish is at home. At least according to history. So it is very appropriate to also learn the Spanish slang that is spoken as Spain slang. It is considerably different from the slang that is spoken in other Spanish speaking countries, and sometimes fascinating to see how they compare. Beware that not all the words are ‘safe’ to use in everyday situations, as they may easily be misunderstood to be too rude to be acceptable.

Some Spanish slang from Spain:

1)  Spanish Slang: Botellón

     English: Outdoor drinking party or gathering in a square, street, park, or other public place with alcohol purchased cheaply at supermarkets or corner shops.

2) Spanish Slang: Buenas

    English: A greeting used at any time of the day. Similar to Hello / Hola, but more informal.

3)  Spanish Slang: Cabezota

     English: Stubborn, when used as an adjective, and a stubborn person, when used as a noun.

4) Spanish Slang: Caray

    English: God, oh my God, darn, darn it!

5)  Spain Slang: Casero

     English: Landlord. Note: Casera, apart from a female landlord, is a soda that, mixed into red wine, makes tinto de verano, a light summer drink. And as an adjective, casero means home-made.

6) Spanish Slang: Chalado

    English: Crazy or nuts. Estar chalado = To be crazy or nuts.

7)  Spanish Slang: Chapuza

     English: Shoddy work.

8) Spanish Slang: Chaval / chavala

    English: Guy, boy, kid, lad / girl

9)  Spanish Slang: Chino

     English: Corner shop, convenience store. When all the other supermarkets and stores in Spain are closed, you can usually find a chino open. Chino also refers to the Chinese language, a Chinese person, and a Chinese restaurant.

10) Spanish Slang: Chiringuito

    English: Beach bar or seaside restaurant

11)  Spanish Slang: Chorrada

     English: Nonsense. ¡Qué chorrada! = What a bit of nonsense!

12) Spanish Slang: Chulo

    English: When used as an adjective, chulo can mean: 1) nice, cool, etc. 2) cute, good-looking, 3) arrogant, insolent, cocky. ¡Qué chulo! = How cute! How cool! However, used as a noun, chulo means a pimp.

13) Spanish Slang: Currar

    English: To work (a verb). Your workplace or job is your curro.

14)  Spanish Slang: Cutre

     English: Cheap, seedy, shabby, tacky, kitschy, cheesy.

15) Spanish Slang: De puta madre

    English: Bloody awesome, really kickass

16) Spanish Slang: Enchufe

    English: A connection, a contact, someone who has some kind of power or influence and can help you. An enchufe could get you a job interview, for example. Enchufe literally means a plug or a socket though.

17)  Spanish Slang: Entender

     English: To be gay. However, the primary definition of the Spanish word entender is to understand, so keep in mind that if someone at a bar asks you “¿Entiendes?” it could just as likely be a reflection on your Spanish skills as an attempt to find out your sexual preferences.

18) Spanish Slang: Estar como una cabra

    English: To be completely crazy, nuts, bonkers.

19) Spain Slang: Finde

    English: Weekend. Shortened version of fin de semana.

20) Spain Slang: Friki

    English: Nerd, geek, freak. For example, a friki de ordenadores is a computer nerd and a friki de ciencia ficción is a sci-fi geek.

21) Spanish Slang: Guarro

    English: Filthy, disgusting.

 


 

About Spanish Slang:

There are more than 350 million people on this planet that speak Spanish as their first language. Every day, every where, the language of the streets evolves and new Spanish slang is born. This websites is a great Spanish slang collection that aims to gather all the slang from all the countries in the Spanish speaking world.

The language can be very different from one place to the other. As an example, in Spain you will often here the ‘slang’ word “tio” to mean ‘dude’. However, in Mexico you would seldom hear tio in this context. You would rather hear ‘guei’.
You see, learning Spanish comes in many different stages, and right from the start it is important to learn the formal language as well as the slang, or the language ‘as spoken by the people’.

You need to be aware of the fact, that Spanish slang is often so commonly used that you can hardly call it slang anymore. This doesn’t mean however, that you can ignore the rules of formal language when speaking Spanish. Please thrive to be kind and educated at all times.

This site is an attempt to collect all the Spanish slang in the world and make it easy to trace, look-up and learn it via this website.

Feel free to contribute to the collection as it should be ever expanding.

Happy Spanish learning!

Saludos, the Spanish-Slang Team

Useful Links:

http://www.languagerealm.com/spanish/spanishslang.php

http://www.bbc.co.uk/languages/spanish/cool/

http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/Spanish/Slang

http://www.humanities.uci.edu/spanish/spain-slang.htm

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=spanish%20slang

http://wikilatino.com/index.php/Spanish_Slang_Words_%26_Phrases